Maggie


You have found the area where your ancestor lived in the mid 1800’s.  And, you have determined where it was that your ancestor went to church.  Where are the records?

Sometimes the exact same church will have the records that contain information concerning your ancestor.  However, sometimes it will not.

Did their church keep the records?  Or, were the records donated to a repository for records of the denomination?  Another possibility is that their church became a “part” of a larger congregation.  In this case, the “newer” church may have the records.

Maggie

In the 1860 U. S. Census, there is a column that is labeled, “Married within the year”.  It could be that this notation will be the first, or only, indication as to when your ancestor married.

In the census image shown here, one can see that Elijah and Cashelia were married in the year preceding the 1860 census.  It could be that there is no other record of their marriage.

1860-for-blog

 

 

 

 

 

 

Maggie

When encountering an abbreviation on a document, be careful about the meaning of the abbreviation. Over the years, abbreviations have changed.

One example is state abbreviations used in census records.

If the abbreviation for the state of birth is “Ia”, do you know what state it is signifying?  This may be Iowa, or it may be Indiana!

Be careful!

Maggie

You have searched and searched for your ancestor, and you are not finding him. Maybe your ancestor was known by another name.

You may have an ancestor that was called by a different name than what you were told was his name.  The first name that you were told may have been John.  However, maybe John was his middle name, and others knew him by Richard (his real first name).

Maggie

When you make a copy of a deed or letter, or some other document, save the copy along with the transcription of the document.

The copy and the transcription can be saved in one folder (so that they do not get separated one from the other), or in one PDF file.

Maggie

Sometimes the name of the person, as specified in the record, is the actual name of the person.

I knew someone whose name was Katie.  Katie was not short for Katherine, or any other name.

Maggie

Sometimes an ancestor’s death notice may have appeared in more than one newspaper.

I know of one ancestor whose obituary appeared in the local English newspaper, and also had an obituary in the local German-speaking newspaper.  Each obituary had some of the same information, but each also had information that was not in the other.

Maggie

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