December 2016


I want to wish everyone a Merry Christmas and a Happy Hanukkah!

Maggie

As noted in the first blog of this series, recently re-discovered are the metal boxes that line the walls of the back room of the Clerk’s office.

Remember, the location of each box, and its contents, is documented in a chart. The Putnam County Public Library Local History Dept. has a copy (http://pcpl21.org/services/local-history/lhdesk@pcpl21.org), I have a copy (mcgen@championpair.com), and there are a few other copies “floating around”.  If you would like more information, do not hesitate to contact either the library or me.

I decided that I would trace a probate record, in a book, to “papers” in a box.  Below are the scans that followed the probate record for the estate of Alexander Bryant – died in Putnam Co.  The first scan is from Probate Order Book E (Dec. 1852-May 1885) and the next three are from Book 1 (June 1855-March 1857).  The very last one is from Book 2 (June 1857-June 1859).  It is interesting that the Book E entry is the first entry in the books having to do with Bryant’s Estate.

pob-e-dec-1852-thru-may-1855-p-429-cropped

 

 

 

 

 

pob-1-june-1855-thru-march-1857-page-89-cropped  pob-1-june-1855-thru-march-1857-page-285-cropped  pob-1-june-1855-thru-march-1857-page-286-cropped-one

pob-2-june-1857-thru-june-1859-page-84-one

 

 

 

 

 

 

As can be seen from the scans, sometimes the last name of the deceased is Bryan, and sometimes the name is Bryant.  Samuel H. Bryant is the Administrator of the estate.  On page 285 of Book 1, the legal heirs are listed.

The box that contains the papers for this estate is Common Pleas Court – Probate Causes – Mch, June, Sept. & Dec. Terms, 1858 N-A-20.  The papers are many – over 100 papers.  I will highlight a few here in order to show some information that was in the papers but not in the Probate Order Books. The name Bryan and Bryant were used in the documents.  The earliest dated receipt in the papers was that of 15 November 1847.  The earliest dated receipt in the papers that lists Samuel H. Bryant as the Administrator is that of 2 May 1854.

cpcpc-abe-11-vouchers-5-another-back    cpcpc-abe-bl-state-of-indiana cpcpc-abe-state-of-indiana-1-sheet-inside-back cpcpc-abe-shb-admin-inside-16-1-back cpcpc-abe-11-vouchers-11-back cpcpc-abe-shb-admin-inside-16-10-back cpcpc-abe-shb-admin-inside-16-15-back

 

As you can tell, much information is given.  It may be that someone researching Alexander Bryant, or any of the others mentioned, does not know the information that is given.  So, investigating the papers in this box could be beneficial to the researcher.

Stay tuned for blog number 6 in this series!

Maggie

As noted in the first blog of this series, recently re-discovered are the metal boxes that line the walls of the back room of the Clerk’s office.

Remember, the location of each box, and its contents, is documented in a chart. The Putnam County Public Library Local History Dept. has a copy (http://pcpl21.org/services/local-history/lhdesk@pcpl21.org), I have a copy (mcgen@championpair.com), and there are a few other copies “floating around”.  If you would like more information, do not hesitate to contact either the library or me.

A box with the label, “Guardianship 1895-1898” caught my eye recently.  There were many boxes with a similar label.  Some of the labels included dates, some included names, some included the first letter of the name, and some had no further information.  There were many folders in this box.

In this box is a folder that is labeled Putnam County Court – Martha E. Walls, a person of unsound mind, Ed McG. Walls, Guardian, and had letters issued 24 February 1891.

I am including the papers filed here for your reading.  I think it is interesting that a list of the jurors is given in the folder.

guardianship-1895-thru-1898-box-martha-e-walls-folderguardianship-1895-thru-1898-box-martha-e-walls-folder-document-4-frontguardianship-1895-thru-1898-box-martha-e-walls-folder-document-4-backguardianship-1895-thru-1898-box-martha-e-walls-folder-document-1-backguardianship-1895-thru-1898-box-martha-e-walls-folder-document-2-front-no-backguardianship-1895-thru-1898-box-martha-e-walls-folder-document-3-back

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

As you can tell, much information is given.  It may be that someone researching Martha E. Walls, or any of the others mentioned, does not know the information that is given.  So, investigating the papers in this box could be beneficial to the researcher.

Stay tuned for blog number 5 in this series!

Maggie

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I have finally taken the time to learn how to analyze the DNA test results that I have received from Ancestry, FTDNA, and GEDMatch.

I know a professional genealogist, Andrea Ackermann, who specializes in DNA research and how the DNA results aid in researching one’s family tree.  She gave me individualized instruction on analyzing my data from all three companies.  I recommend Andrea when it comes to DNA analysis.  If you would like her email address, just let me know!

Andrea recommended that I purchase the book, Genetic Genealogy in Practice, by Blaine T. Bettinger and Debbie Parker Wayne.  I have read a few of the chapters so far, and completed the exercises.  This book, along with the individualized instruction, has really helped me to understand all of my results.  Another book recommended by Andrea is, The Family Tree Guide To DNA Testing and Genetic Genealogy, by Blaine T. Bettinger.  I just received the shipping notification, and I am awaiting the delivery of the book.

I cannot recommend enough having individualized instruction, and the books, to aid in understanding DNA test results.

Maggie

Have you found the school that your ancestor attended?  Have you checked on the availability of that school’s newspaper?

Here are some snapshots from the newspaper of Stanford High in Stanford, KY.  Both of my parents graduated from here.  The snapshots are portions of the paper that mention my father, a senior in 1940.

3090-lincolnian-may-23-1940-1-1-cropped3090-lincolnian-may-23-1940-2-1-cropped3090-lincolnian-may-23-1940-2-1-cropped-another

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3090-lincolnian-may-23-1940-2-2-cropped3090-lincolnian-may-23-1940-3-1-cropped

As noted in the paper, my father was “Better known by – Cobby”, and his “Favorite Pastime – Model T’ing around” (I have a photo of his car.).  He was “Likely to be found – Gazing at Mary Thomas” (don’t know who this was), and his “Greatest Asset – Sparking” (not sure what this means).  His “Ambition – To be brave and bold”, was shown when he enlisted in the Army Air Corps during WWII.  He was Exchange Editor, and his sister, Betty M. Bryan, was one of the Reporters.  In 1941, he wanted to be “sitting around in his Model T. Ford”.  One of his good friends, Alfred Pettus, was “Likely to be found – Bob’s” (my father told me many stories about being with Alfred).  And, under the Class Prophecy, my father was to be an agriculture teacher – he worked in agriculture, received an agriculture degree (after WWII) from the University of Kentucky, worked as a soil scientist, and then worked at the Dept. of Agriculture in Washington, D.C., until retirement.

See if you can find the school newspaper.  You may discover some things you didn’t know!

Maggie

As noted in the first blog of this series, recently re-discovered are the metal boxes that line the walls of the back room of the Clerk’s office.

Remember, the location of each box, and its contents, is documented in a chart. The Putnam County Public Library Local History Dept. has a copy (http://pcpl21.org/services/local-history/lhdesk@pcpl21.org), I have a copy (mcgen@championpair.com), and there are a few other copies “floating around”.  If you would like more information, do not hesitate to contact either the library or me.

A box with the label, “Miss. State Reformatory Probate, Election 1910-1935” caught my eye recently.  I did not see any other boxes with a similar label, and this “label” is not noted on the chart.  There are many folders in this box.

miss-state-reformatory-probate-election-1910-thru-1935-box

In this box is a folder that is labeled Continuing Recognizance in the amount of $500, and was filed 12 February 1918.  Harry W. Moore was the Clerk.

miss-state-reformatory-probate-election-1910-thru-1935-box-recognizance-bond-front

I am including the Recognizance Bond here for your reading.

miss-state-reformatory-probate-election-1910-thru-1935-box-recognizance-bond-back

As you can tell, much information is given.  It may be that someone researching Leslie Ellis, or any of the others mentioned, does not know the information that is given.  So, investigating the papers in this box could be beneficial to the researcher.

Stay tuned for blog number 4 in this series!

Maggie

Take a look at this death certificate.  What information can be gleaned from it?

death-cert-edward-tolbert

Name of Deceased

Date of Death

Age of Deceased – and Birth Date and Birth Location

Place of Death – Hospital Name

Spouse’s Name – Married Name and Maiden Name

Occupation of Deceased

Where the Deceased Resided

Father’s and Mother’s Name

Cause of Death – and How Long Had Been the Illness

Physician’s Name and Where Office Located

Burial Location – Cemetery (with Address) – and Date of Burial

Funeral Home and Health Officer

 

This is quite a bit of information from one record!

 

Maggie