December 2015


Do you ever experience the feeling of being overwhelmed?

I have had this feeling a number of times! It is the feeling you get when you are beginning to find things about your “now known” ancestor. You are finding actual records online, you are finding “possibilities” online, you are hearing from people who you have contacted – it is a good feeling at first. Then, you realize that you don’t really know what you know – you know quite a bit, but you aren’t sure of exactly what it is that you know.

At that point, when you are feeling overwhelmed, it is time to sit back, relax, and organize what you have discovered. Then, you can begin your actual searching again once you are organized. And, you will realize what area you will need to focus on for the time being – military records or probate records or something else.

Take a deep breath, organize, and then search again. You will be glad you did!

Maggie

I was researching someone who purchased land in Indiana. I had determined the section, township, and range of the land he had purchased. However, I didn’t really understand all that I was seeing – he did not purchase the land from anyone (no grantor), yet he purchased the land several years after others purchased their land from the United States government.

What I was finding was that the land had originally been “set aside” for a school – this land had not been sold to anyone initially, but had been “given” to the county government for a school. A school was never built on the land, so the land was available for purchase.

And, how did I determine this? I asked the county recorder! She knew exactly about what I was asking when I told her the section and township – most of these same section-numbers, in various townships, were set aside for a school.

If you aren’t sure about how the land was originally meant to be developed, ask the recorder!

Maggie

As thoughts of Christmas are upon us, I thought I would share some photos that I have acquired. I don’t remember some these being taken, as I was born in March before Christmas 1954.

page 13 Orleans France Nov 1944-Aug 1945 Christmas 1944 Officers Mess  a photo found in my dad’s photographs he took during World War II – taken in Orleans, France

1954 Christmas Bryan family - Bob Rebecca Betsy holding Mar  a photo of my family before my younger sister was born – that is my mom and dad and older sister with me as a baby

1954 Christmas lt to rt John Rodman Jr and Elizabeth holding  a photo taken about the same time as the one above – my grandparents, John and Elizabeth Bradshaw, are in the photo as is my uncle (my mom’s brother) – I am being held by “Muno”- I do not know who “Gangy” is holding, but it is probably my cousin who was born in August 1954 – my older sister is also in the photo

1960 probably Christmas front  a photo of a Christmas get-together at the home of my grandparents, John and Elizabeth Bradshaw – I am the second youngster on the left side, my father being behind me

Feb 83 Bradshaw and Champion families 009 a photo taken Christmas 1982 – you can see me, very pregnant, in the back row

 

Make sure and take plenty of photos this Christmas so that others will be able to share the memories in years to come.

Maggie

Do you ever wonder why there are “age” differences in the U. S. Census? How can your ancestor be 45 years of age in 1860 and 50 years of age in 1870?

At the time when those censuses were taken, people did not necessarily know when they were born, or exactly how old they were. This was not something thought of as important.

So don’t be surprised about how many years your ancestor aged in the time between censuses!

Maggie

How long has it been since you checked your favorite genealogical websites for new information?

Some of the most popular websites – ancestry.com, familysearch.org, fold3.com, findmypast.com, newspaperarchive.com – are always posting new records. Other less popular websites that you have found are also posting new records.

Just like you are making new discoveries as you research, they are posting new records!

Maggie

As shown previously, Christian Friedrick Martin Bringe and his wife, Marie Hahn Bringe, arrived in the U. S. with his children Joh., Friedr. Ernst, Carl, Anna, Martin, and Albert, on the ship Moravia, on 14 November 1884 from Germany.

As has been shown in previous posts, Friedrick and Marie (Hahn) had the following children: Frederich C. (born 1873), Anna Maria (born 6 September 1878), Martin Friedrich Wilhelm (born 20 October 1880), Ernest H. (born 22 December 1875), Carl Friederich (born 6 September 1878), and Albert Henry (born 2 June 1883).

Recently found are some diaries that belonged to Albert Henry Bringe. As discovered in the diaries, he worked in various states, and in Canada, in the early 1900’s, as a person who dug oil wells. The diaries are shedding some light as to his travels and the process of digging an oil well!

As shown in Bringe-30, another of the diaries is another that is dated 1905. Here is a scan from the diary that was shown in that previous post:

diary 1905 inside 3 Charlotte Wolter address

Upon finding the address for a Miss Charlotte Wolter, I began to examine this Wolter family. Much has been discovered about this family.

On 25 April 1892, the Johann Wolters family arrived at the port of New York, New York, on the ship Columbia. In the Johann Wolters family were his wife Martha and his daughter Charlotte.
The 1900 U. S. Census record for Chicago, Cook Co., IL, shows that John Walter was born in May 1860 (employed as a carpenter), Martha in August 1865, Charlotte in June 1889, Katherine in November 1896, and Elma in October 1899.
On 8 October 1900, John Wolter was naturalized as a U. S. citizen.
The 1910 U. S. Census record for Chicago, Cook Co., IL, shows that John Wolter was residing there. In his household was John (49 years of age, employed as a carpenter), wife Martha (44 years of age), daughter Charlotte (20 years of age, employed as a stenographer), daughter Katherine (13 years of age), and son Elmer (11 years of age).
The 1920 U. S. Census for Chicago, Cook Co., IL, shows that John Wolter was residing there. In his household was John (59 years of age, employed as a carpenter), wife Martha (54 years of age), daughter Charlotte (30 years of age, employed as a stenographer), daughter Katharine (23 years of age, employed as a typist and clerk), and son Elmer (20 years of age, employed as a draftsman).
The 1930 U. S. Census for Chicago, Cook Co., IL, shows that John Wolter was residing there. In his household was John (69 years of age, employed as a carpenter), wife Martha (64 years of age), daughter Charlotte (40 years of age, employed as a stenographer), and son Elmer (30 years of age, employed as a draftsman).
The 1940 U. S. Census for Canton City, Stark Co., OH, shows that John Wolter was residing there in the household of his son, Elmer. Elmer (age 40) and his wife, Ruth, were in the household, as was John (age 80, widowed).

According to an obituary in the Chicago Sunday Tribune on 4 June 1944, John Wolter died in Canton, Ohio. He was the husband of the late Martha, and father of Charlotte, Kathryn, and Elmer. Burial was to be in Woodlawn Cemetery.
According to the website findagrave.com, John Bernard Wolter is buried in Woodlawn Cemetery in Forest Park, Cook Co., IL. He was born 21 May 1860 in Germany, and died 3 June 1944 in Canton, Stark Co., OH. Someone has also posted on the website that he was the son of Herman Wolter, husband of Martha Wolter, and father of Charlotte, Kathryn, and Elmer.
According to his death certificate, John Bernard Wolter was born 21 May 1860 in Germany, and he died 3 June 1944 in Canton, OH. He was a retired carpenter. His father’s name was Herman Wolter, and there was “no record” of his mother’s name. The informant was Elmer Wolter.

According to an obituary in the Chicago Sunday Tribune on 3 March 1935, Martha Wolter was the wife of John and mother of Charlotte, Mrs. E. L. McCormick, and Elmer J. She was to be buried in Woodlawn Cemetery.
According to the website findagrave.com, Martha Bringe Wolter is buried in Woodlawn Cemetery in Forest Park, Cook Co., IL. She was born in 1866 in Germany, and died 28 February 1935 in Chicago, Cook Co., IL. Someone has also posted on the website that she was the daughter of John Bronge and wife of John Wolter.
According to the index, Illinois Deaths and Stillbirths, as found on the website familysearch.org, Martha Wolter died 28 February 1935 in Chicago, Cook Co., IL. Her father was John Bringe, and her husband was John Wolter.

According to a wedding invitation sent to me by a descendant of the same couple, Kathryn Wolter and Elvert L. McCormick were married 30 September 1925 in Chicago, IL. Their home was to be in Newark, NJ.
According to the website findagrave.com, Kathryn W. McCormick was born 1896 and died August 1967. She was buried in Correctionville Cemetery in Correctionville, Woodbury Co., Iowa. Someone has also posted on the website that her spouse was E. L. “Roy” McCormick and that she was the sister of Charlotte M. Wolter. There is also in the same cemetery the grave of E. L. “Roy” McCormick. According to his gravestone, he was born in 1893 and died in 1987.

Elmer Wolter married Ruth Irene Myers.
According to the website findagrave.com, Elmer H. Wolter is buried in West Lawn Cemetery in Canton, Stark Co., OH. He was born 11 October 1899 and died 1 May 1955. According to his obituary in the Canton Repository (2 May 1955, p. 24), Elmer A. Wolter died 1 May 1955 at 55 years of age. He arrived in Canton 21 years before from native Chicago. His widow was Mrs. Ruth Myers Wolter. His sisters were Miss Charlotte Wolter of Chicago and Mrs. E. L. McCormack of La Jolla, California. He was to be buried in West Lawn Cemetery.

Charlotte Wolter is found in the 1940 U. S. Census as residing in Chicago, Cook Co., IL. According to the census entry, Charlotte was born about 1890 (50 years of age) in Germany, and is divorced. Also, she is a naturalized citizen and is working as a stenographer.
According to a memorial page on the website fold3.com, Charlotte Wolter was born 25 June 1889 and died in March 1977. Her last residence was Correctionville, IA.
According to the website findagrave.com, Charlotte is buried in Correctionville Cemetery in Correctionville, Woodbury Co., IA. Someone has also posted on the website that she was the sister of Mrs. E. L. McCormick – Kathryn W. McCormick. According to her gravestone, Charlotte M. Wolter was the sister of Mrs. E. L. McCormick, 1889-1977.

There is obviously more research to be done to definitely link this family to the Albert Bringe family. However, it is thought that perhaps John Bringe, the father of Martha Bringe Wolter, was the brother of Albert Bringe’s father (Christian Frederick Bringe).

One other interesting thing to note – there are those with the surname Bringe buried in Cook Co., IL, and those with the surname Wolter buried in Ottawa Co., OH.

More in Bringe-32.

Maggie

You have searched and searched, and finally found a resource that may contain information about your ancestor. The book is a transcription of commission’s records, and there is a name in there that may be your ancestor.

I was recently researching for a client, and came upon this exact situation. In the book, it was shown that a man named Asa O. Jones was appointed a constable. The ancestor’s name is Asa O. Ives. Asa is an unusual name. And, before actually using the record, the original needed to be found to confirm this information.

The original was found, and in the record it is clearly Asa O. Ives, the ancestor!

Be careful!

Maggie

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