November 2013


When encountering a brick wall, don’t forget to examine records of the extended family.

Look at the siblings of the ancestor. Also, what about cousins? It could be that by examining these records, more will be found about the ancestor. And, even if you don’t, you will still find out interesting family info.

Maggie

How long has it been since you looked for info on great-grandfather Joseph? Has it been quite awhile?

Websites are always updating the records which they have. It could be that the grave which you looked for on findagrave.com and didn’t find, is now there!

So, check again!

Maggie

A few weeks ago, I could not read the handwriting on a marriage document. The name of the church was very difficult to read. The wedding took place in the 1920’s in Bronx, New York. So, I “Google-d” what I could decipher of the name of the church. Google helped by asking me, “Did you mean…” I found the correct name!
Maggie

Recently, while researching an immigrant, I was trying to decipher the name of the person the immigrant was joining in the United States. I was having a really difficult time reading the handwriting of the Ellis Island recorder. I put the immigration record aside for a while.

Then, I was looking at the marriage record of the same immigrant. The name of one of the witnesses sounded vaguely familiar. So, I searched through my research with the hope of finding out where before I had heard the name.

And, what I discovered was that the immigration name sounded like the marriage name – it was the same person!

Maggie

When visiting the cemetery to look for a specific grave, make sure to map the location of the grave. Draw a picture, making sure to add the graves on all sides of the one in which you are interested. Also, walk through the entire cemetery looking for the same last name. Relatives may be buried in the same cemetery. Wouldn’t you want to find your ancestor’s relatives on the first visit to the cemetery?

You never know when you may get a chance to revisit a cemetery, so gather as much information as possible the first visit!

Maggie

Have you ever had the address of where your ancestor lived, but were unable to find the address in the census?

One time when researching, I discovered that one side of the road was in one “town” and the other side of the road was in the “neighboring town” – the official boundary went down the middle of the road! So, to find out who was living on the road, it was necessary to look at census records for two different towns!

Maggie

Hello Everyone,

This is just a test to make sure that posts are also showing on my Facebook page. For some reason, they have not been posting. I wish I knew why! If anyone has ideas, please let me know!

Maggie

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