November 2012


I was going to Fairfax, VA, for my 40th high school reunion.  My husband and I would be in the area for a few days.  So, the thought came to me – go to NARA while there.  We would have entire day at NARA!

Along with my 2 double-sided sheets of paper, we had quarters for the lockers.  And, we had cash and credit cards for copies (either is accepted).  We took our cell phones and kept them on vibrate.  One hint that someone gave was to have a quart-sized Ziploc bag with all of our items in it.  And, one more important item – a photo ID.  That is needed in more than one place in NARA.

We took the Metro downtown, and got off at the Federal Triangle station.  There is a closer station to the National Archives, but we chose to do this station for two reasons.  One, we would have had to change trains to go to the other station. And, two, we wanted the exercise!

We got to NARA at 8:50 AM.  We went in the front door (Pennsylvania Avenue), and did the screening process.  Then, we waited with all of the other researchers that had arrived before 9AM.  At 9AM we went into the large room directly in front of the front door.  At the center of the room, there was a help desk.   This person was very friendly, and directed us to a certain desk to begin the orientation process.  We first watched a 10-minute slide-show on a computer, and then completed the process to obtain our researcher cards.  A photo ID was required.  And, our photos were taken!

Then, we went through another door (on the left side of the room) and learned about filling out the “Request For Military Records.”  We went to large tables in the center of the large room (that we went into at the beginning of our visit), and filled out forms.  Each person is allowed 4 records to be pulled at each pulling – 10AM, 11AM, 1:30PM, and 2:30PM.  So, since there were 2 of us, we each filled out 4 slips.  The slips were then deposited in a wooden tray across from the archivist through the “another door” mentioned at the beginning of this paragraph.   (After the 10AM slips were taken out of the wooden tray, we put in 3 more for the 11AM pull.)

Since I had questions about the Hospital Corps and about the carded medical records, I went to room G-24 – on the right side of the large room.  I was able to turn in 2 records to be pulled from that area as well (I could have done 4 if I had had that many).

Then, we put most of our items in a locker and went downstairs to the cafeteria to get lunch.  It was expensive, but nutritious.

More in my next blog!

Maggie

I am currently researching the Moore family that was in Rowan County, NC, from the late 1700’s to about 1836.  At that time, they left Rowan County to travel to Indiana, settling in 1836 in the Summitville area of Madison County.  George and his wife, Mary Beck, were the father and mother who traveled, and some of their “almost grown” children traveled with them.  So far, I have been told that Aquilla was their son. However, I have not yet been able to prove this.

I received a marriage bond from the Rowan Library, and included with bond was the permission from the bride’s mother.  I can read the bond just fine – William Moore and Margaret Patton. However,I have had a difficult time reading the “permission” portion.   I am hopeful that someone will be able to read it better than I! So far, for me, I have had a difficult time reading the second line.  If you can read it, please let me know! To enlarge, click on the image.

Thank you, Maggie

I was going to Fairfax, VA, for my 40th high school reunion.  My husband and I would be in the area for a few days.  So, the thought came to me – go to NARA while there.  We would have entire day at NARA!

So, now I had completed my research.  I was careful to make a document for me to take inside with me at NARA.  In this document was a copy of each of the pension cards for everyone for whom I wanted a pension or CMSR.  I also had the Record Group Number and T288 for each pension record.  These pension records were obtained from ancestry.com.  Additionally, I make copies of the service record forms for each person from fold3.  This way, I could be assured of every unit in which the veteran served.

I was careful to have the length of the document no longer than 2 sheets of  double-sided paper.  In the room where one actually views the records, there is a limit as to what you can bring in the room.

So, I had my 2 double-sided sheets of paper with all of the information that I thought I may need.

Then, I watched the video that is on the NARA website.  It was very helpful!

I checked about taking my Flip Pal scanner.  I could take it.  However, the record could not extend over the edge of the scanner.  And, it was not allowed to place the scanner on top of the paper – turning the scanner over.  So, unless I knew that I would have small papers to scan, there was no need to take.  We thought about taking our camera.  In fact, we did take it with us.  However, we did not use it.  Because of the amount of records that we had to copy (either on the copy machine or by photo), we decided to make copies instead of photos.  We were unsure about taking photographs and we were there for a limited time.  If we had known that we would be going back for another day, we probably would have taken photos instead.

Along with my 2 double-sided sheets of paper, we had quarters for the lockers.  And, we had cash and credit cards for copies (either is accepted).  We took our cell phones and kept them on vibrate.  One hint that someone gave was to have a quart-sized Ziploc bag with all of our items in it.  This is what we did, and it worked great!

One more item:  Upon first getting to NARA (they opened at 9AM), we went through a screening process.  All loose items (including from pockets) with through the scanner.  We walked through a scanner.  Then, we went into a very large room to begin the introductory procedure.  After requesting records, it takes about 1-1 ½ hours to get the records.  For receiving the records, one goes upstairs to room 203 – the Central Research Room. The first big room we went in does not have restrictions on what can be brought in. Room 203 is the room with restrictions.

More in my next blog.

Maggie

I was going to Fairfax, VA, for my 40th high school reunion.  My husband and I would be in the area for a few days.  So, the thought came to me – go to NARA while there.  We would have entire day at NARA!

It is important to make a copy of the actual pension record for the veteran – this was the copy that was on ancestry.com.  It is important to have the company and regiment, and it is important to know that the index for pensions is on T288 and are in record group 15.

Here is the pension record for Orlow Babcock:

 

 

I knew that Orlow was injured during the war (I had found him in a newspaper article in Rochester, NY, that listed those who had entered into hospital).  I asked where I may find the carded medical records.  I was told to go to Room G-24 – right across from where one submits pulls for pensions and CMSRs.  There was an archivist there that was the expert on Hospital Records!  He explained about the carded records – they were sorted by state and the first letter of the last name.  The form that one uses in this room is different.  Your name and researcher card number are required.  And, then there is a big blank area.  The archivist will tell you what to write in that area.

At the bottom of the form is some signature blocks – these will be used when they actually hand you the cards.

More in my next blog!

Maggie

I was going to Fairfax, VA, for my 40th high school reunion.  My husband and I would be in the area for a few days.  So, the thought came to me – go to NARA while there.  We would have entire day at NARA!

The first thing I did was decide what records I was interested in obtaining.  In order to decide this, I made a list of all of my and my husband’s relatives that were in either the Civil War or the Spanish American War.  And, there were quite a few!  Then, I did research using both fold3 and ancestry.

It is important to make a copy of the actual pension record for the veteran – this was the copy that was on ancestry.com.  It is important to have the company and regiment, and it is important to know that the index for pensions is on T288 and are in record group 15.  This is important for both the pension records and the CMSRs (compiled military service records).

Here is the pension record for Llewellyn E. Champion:

 

If you look real close, you will see a small “s” on the Widow line.  This little “s” means that Llewellyn E. Champion was a veteran of the Spanish American War.  (His pension record was found under the Civil War Pensions on ancestry.)

Since Llewellyn was also in the Hospital Corps, I went to Room G-24 – right across from where one submits pulls for pensions and CMSRs.  There was an archivist there that was the expert on Hospital Records!  He explained about how there may be special Hospital Corps records, and there may not be. However, it was worth it to try to get them anyway.  The form that one uses in this room is different.  Your name and researcher card number are required.  And, then there is a big blank area.  The archivist will tell you what to write in that area.

At the bottom of the form is some signature blocks – these will be used when they actually hand you the folder.

Maggie

I was going to Fairfax, VA, for my 40th high school reunion.  My husband and I would be in the area for a few days.  So, the thought came to me – go to NARA while there.  We would have entire day at NARA!

The first thing I did was decide what records I was interested in obtaining.  In order to decide this, I made a list of all of my and my husband’s relatives that were in either the Civil War or the Spanish American War.  And, there were quite a few!  Then, I did research using both fold3 and ancestry.

It is important to make a copy of the actual pension record for the veteran – this was the copy that was on ancestry.com.  It is important to have the company and regiment, and it is important to know that the index for pensions is on T288 and are in record group 15.  This is important for both the pension records and the CMSRs (compiled military service records).

Here is the pension record for Llewellyn E. Champion:

If you look real close, you will see a small “s” on the Widow line.  This little “s” means that Llewellyn E. Champion was a veteran of the Spanish American War.  (His pension record was found under the Civil War Pensions on ancestry.)

The form that had to be filled out at NARA was called” Request for Military Records.”  I want to explain that this was the form when I was there.  By the time someone else goes, it could be that the form is different.  This is what the form requires:

Date – current date

Name of Requestor – your name                                                      Agency or Address – researcher’s card number

RG NO. – 15

Record Identification – Pension

Name of Soldier – Llewellyn E. Champion (put a circle around the last name)        Name of Dependent – Mildred S. Champion

Unit (Co, Bn, Regt) – I 6 Ohio Inf                        War – SAW                           State Served From – OH

Pension File Numbers

Application                                            Certificate

  1. Invalid                                    1446619                                                                1189922
  2. Widow                                   1178444                                                                905361
  3. Minor
  4. Father
  5. Other Numbers

At the bottom of the form is some signature blocks – these will be used when they actually hand you the folder.

You will also see something about Hospital Corps on this pension record.  More about that in my next blog.

Maggie

I was going to Fairfax, VA, for my 40th high school reunion.  My husband and I would be in the area for a few days.  So, the thought came to me – go to NARA while there.  We would have entire day at NARA!

The first thing I did was decide what records I was interested in obtaining.  In order to decide this, I made a list of all of my and my husband’s relatives that were in either the Civil War or the Spanish American War.  And, there were quite a few!  Then, I did research using both fold3 and ancestry.

It is important to make a copy of the actual pension record for the veteran – this was the copy that was on ancestry.com.  It is important to have the company and regiment, and it is important to know that the index for pensions is on T288 and are in record group 15.  This is important for both the pension records and the CMSRs (compiled military service records).

Here is the pension record for Joseph Franklin Pettus:

If you look real close, you will see a small “s” on the Service line.  This little “s” means that Joseph F. Pettus was a veteran of the Spanish American War.  (His pension record was found under the Civil War Pensions on ancestry.)

The form that had to be filled out at NARA was called” Request for Military Records.”  I want to explain that this was the form when I was there.  By the time someone else goes, it could be that the form is different.  This is what the form requires:

Date – current date

Name of Requestor – your name                                                      Agency or Address – researcher’s card number

RG NO. – 15

Record Identification – Military

Name of Soldier – Joseph Franklin Pettus   (put a circle around the last name)      Name of Dependent – [blank]

Unit (Co, Bn, Regt) – Co F Regt 2 KY Inf                            War – SAW                           State Served From – KY

Pension File Numbers

Application                                            Certificate

  1. Invalid
  2. Widow                                   NONE OF THIS IS NEEDED FOR CMSRs
  3. Minor
  4. Father
  5. Other Numbers

At the bottom of the form is some signature blocks – these will be used when they actually hand you the folder.

More in my next blog.

Maggie

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