October 2012


More on the mystery of John Bradshaw:

John Bradshaw and Catherine Huffman had children Leander (my ancestor), Matilda, John Monroe, Elijah Liter, Julia, Mary Ann, Malinda, Sarah Ann, and Susan Catherine.

More on Matilda and Edward Martin:

A marriage certificate has been found for Matilda A. Bradshaw and Edward P. Martin.  They married in St. Louis, Missouri, on 27 February 1848.  So, more questions.  Why did they go to St. Louis to marry?  Did they do this because Matilda did not have consent from her mother to marry?  Or, did Matilda not have consent from her guardian, Thomas Conn?  So many questions!

So, Matilda and Edward have been found living in Nelson County, KY, with Matilda’s brother, in the 1850 census (an R. Martin, age 17, was living with them).  In 1860, they are living in Vermillion County, Illinois (Katie Wilson (7), Mary Mandrig, Wm E. Martin (17), and E. G. Draper are living with them).  By 1870, they are living in Jefferson County, KY (Julia (13) and Gertrude (12) Bradshaw, and Kate Trigg (5), are living with them).  In 1880, they are back in Nelson County (Katie Trigg (14) is living with them).

I do not yet know when Edward Martin died.  I do know that Matilda died at the Home for Aged and Infirm in Louisville, Kentucky on 12 January 1911, and is buried in Eastern Cemetery in Louisville.  I have contacted the cemetery, and many of their records for the time period before 1911 have been lost.  So, if Edward is buried there, there is no way to find him!  I have not found Matilda in a census in 1900 or 1910 either.  I wonder where she was!

If I could find the will for Edward, then maybe I would know whether or not they had their own children.   And, a will may explain who the young Bradshaw’s were in 1870.  I have had no success as yet in finding a will for Edward.

Maggie

More on the mystery of John Bradshaw:

John Bradshaw and Catherine Huffman had children Leander (my ancestor), Matilda, John Monroe, Elijah Liter, Julia, Mary Ann, Malinda, Sarah Ann, and Susan Catherine.

Matilda married Edward Martin – this is known from John’s will.  I have found Edward and Matilda in census records in 1850, 1870 and 1880 (1850 Nelson Co., 1870 Jefferson Co., 1880 Nelson Co.).  In 1870, also in their household were Julia (13) and Gertrude (12) Bradshaw.  Who were these young Bradshaw’s? Also in the household in 1870 and 1880 was Kate/Katie Trigg – in 1880 she is listed as a niece.  Who was she?  This Kate/Katie is the same age (5 in 1870 and 14 in 1880) as a Katie Trigg who was the daughter of Matilda’s sister, Julia.  It could be that Katie was at home with her parents on 9 June 1880 (Oldham Co.) and with her Aunt Matilda on 12 June 1880 (Nelson Co.), as they lived relatively close together.  However, I have not found Julia Trigg (or her husband Hiram) in the 1870 census.

I have found Edward and Matilda living in Vermilion County, Illinois, in the 1860 census.  Also in their household are:  Katie Wilson (age 7), Mary Mandrig, Wm E. Martin, and E. G. Draper.    Is the Wm. E. Martin (age 17) a brother to Edward (age 35)?  This Wm. E. was not living with Edward and Matilda in 1850.  And, is the Katie Wilson a relative of Matilda’s?  Matilda had a sister, Malinda, who married William P. Wilson.  I have found Malinda and William in 1850, but have not found them in any other census year.

I do not yet know when Edward Martin died.  I do know that Matilda died at the Home for Aged and Infirm in Louisville, Kentucky on 12 January 1911, and is buried in Eastern Cemetery in Louisville.  I have contacted the cemetery, and many of their records for the time period before 1911 have been lost.  So, if Edward is buried there, there is no way to find him!  I have not found Matilda in a census in 1900 or 1910 either.  I wonder where she was!

If I could find the will for Edward, then maybe I would know whether or not they had their own children.   And, a will may explain who the young Bradshaw’s were in 1870.  I have had no success as yet in finding a will for Edward.

Maggie

 

 

 

Quite awhile ago, I was researching a family who had married in a town in Illinois and had moved to Iowa 20 years after they married.  They both died at a late age – during the 1880’s.  The wife died first.  When I found her obituary in the local paper (where they lived), not much was said – her name, the date she died, her husband’s name.  That was it!  And, no gravestone could be found.

After much searching, I thought to look for the gravestone where they had originally married – there were still some of that last name living in the same original town!  No gravestone.   But, I decided to look for an obituary anyway.  And, what an obituary was found!   It gave not just the name of the wife and husband, but the names of her parents and grandparents, and all of the children, grandchildren, great-grandchildren, nieces, and nephews!  It even went into what church she had attended (and the years), and where she was to be buried.  Someplace that I had not even thought of – where her parents were buried!

I wish all obituaries gave this much information!

 

Maggie

A few years ago, I was researching a family who lived in Illinois.  I knew that a teenage son had died, and I was trying to find his gravestone.  I knew where the family was living when he died (he died in the census year 1910), so of course that is where I began my search.  I could not find his grave though.  So, I found someone who could look for an obituary in the local newspaper.  In the obituary, it was mentioned that his body was to be transported back to where he was born.  So, I searched there for the grave, and found it!

 

Maggie

I was recently researching a man who had married about 1840.  His wife had died within twenty years of their marriage, and he married again.  In the 1900 census, one of the questions is the birth year, and one is how long the marriage has been.  When the man and his second wife were asked these questions, a rather large mistake was made.  In the census, the man gave his birth date correctly, and then the number of total years he had been married – his first wife plus his second wife!  Then, when the woman was asked, she gave her birth date correctly, and the same number of years that her husband had given.  Of course, this was incorrect – by the wife’s birth date she was 10 when she married!

So, be careful!  Those dates may not be correct!

Maggie

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