April 2012


Dawson Cemetery (1995) is pictured here:

This is an example of what can happen while searching for one’s family.

While researching the Dawson family, my father came upon this cemetery.  The Elijah Dawson family had lived on a farm, and had built and operated a grist mill on Hanging Fork Creek, a few hundred yards from the cemetery.  The mill was built before 1823.  Elijah’s son, John Logan, had inherited the farm and mill when Elijah died in 1856.

When the cemetery was discovered, it was located in a subdivision, Hunters Trace on Grist Mill Road about ¼ mile south of U.S. 150 West.  Before the subdivision was established, the cemetery had been in a farm field, and had not been maintained.  My father decided to restore the cemetery in April 1998.  As of July 1998, 17 gravestones had been discovered.  The oldest identified grave is that of Elijah Dawson, who died in 1856.

This is a photo of the cemetery after restoration:

Maggie

Orlow and Phenie Cordelia Jones Babcock were my great-great grandparents.   This is the 4th blog concerning my research into the father of Orlow, Daniel P. Babcock.

As I stated in my previous blog, I will first show where Orlow was living while he was being raised.  He and his brother, George Washington, were living in the family of William D. Babcock.

In the 1850 U.S. Census for Allegany County, New York, William Q. Babcock is heading his household.1  As of 31 July 1850, in the household were William D. (age 42, Carpenter, born NY), Sarah (age 37, born NY), Fanny C. (age 14, born NY), Martin V. (age 12, born NY), Orlow (age 8, born NY), George W. (age 5, born NY), and Elizabeth C. (age 3, born NY).

In 1860, William Babcock and his family are still in Allegany County, New York.2  As of 20 August 1860, in the household were William (age 51), Sarah (age 48), Martin (age 22), Orlow (age 17), George (age 16), Celinda (age 13), and Mary (age 8).

In 1870, the census in Allegany County, New York, in which the family lives, has been mis-numbered.  Orlow Babcock is shown as being in the previous-to-the-rest-of-his-family household – that of an entirely different family.  Orlow Babcock is in dwelling 239 and family 2433, while the rest of the family is in dwelling 240 and family 244.4 As of 27 July 1870, in the “family” were Orlow (age 27), Phenie (age 23), Martin (age 2), Jennie (age 1/3), William (age 67), and Sarah (age 62).

By 1880, William and Sarah Babcock have died.

This concludes this installment.  Next installment will be more about Daniel P. Babcock.

Maggie

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SOURCES

  1. 1850 U. S. census, Allegany County, New York, population schedule, Centerville, p. 212 (penned), p. 498 (stamped), dwelling 252, family 261, William D. Babcock, digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 1 March 2012); citing National Archives microfilm publication M432, roll 476.
  2. 1860 U. S. census, Allegany County, New York, population schedule, Centerville, p. 301 (stamped previous page), dwelling 1716, family 27, William Babcock, digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 1 March 2012); citing National Archives microfilm publication M653, roll 717.
  3. 1870 U. S. census, Allegany County, New York, population schedule, Wellsville, p. 30 (penned), dwelling 239, family 243, Martin Isac, digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 1 March 2012); citing National Archives microfilm publication M593, roll 905.
  4. 1870 U. S. census, Allegany County, New York, population schedule, Wellsville, p. 774 (stamped), p. 31 (penned), dwelling 240, family 244, Phene, digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 1 March 2012); citing National Archives microfilm publication M593, roll 905.

It is very important to know how to search through the indexes for the census.  It is wonderful that people have given their time to index these for us.  However, mistakes do happen.  I am not citing this error to “put down” someone for their mistake.  I am doing this so that we can understand how difficult it is to transcribe the census!

The 1880 U.S. Census for Dane County, Wisconsin1 – my ancestor’s brother (Babcock) is in the census with his wife and child:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The index says this is Willard Babcock, with Lydia and Cara being in the household.

However, if I single out the name, and enlarge, I see that the first letter is a capital H.  And, comparing the next letter with the “a” in Babcock, I see that it is “Ha”.

 

 

 

 

 

And, upon further comparison of the handwriting with other writing on the page, the name comes out to be “Hadow”.  And, since I know that the name of the ancestor is “Harlow”, I can see that his name could have been Harlow.

I have tried to find “Willard” in the handwriting, but I can’t.  However, I can understand how the indexer found the handwriting to be difficult to read.

Even though I know that Lydia is the wife’s name, I do not see how the indexer got “Lydia” instead of “Sydia” for her name.  On the census page, the “S” and “L” look exactly alike!  Maybe the indexer chose Lydia since Lydia was a name known better than Sydia?

It is very difficult to read the handwriting of the enumerator of every census!  I know I had a difficult time reading just one record.  The indexers are to be commended for doing as well as they do!!

Maggie

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SOURCES

  1. 1880 U.S. census, Dane County, Wisconsin, population schedule, Stoughton, SD 2, ED 69, page 14B (penned), dwelling 125, family 146, Harlow Babcock; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 29 February 2012); citing National Archives microfilm publication T9, roll 1421.

Orlow and Phenie Cordelia Jones Babcock were my great-great grandparents.

Continuing from previous blog:

According to The History of Fond Du Lac County Wisconsin, Daniel P. Babcock was born 1 February 1818 in Riga, Monroe County, New York.  (The History of Fond du Lac County Wisconsin…  Chicago:  Western Historical Company, 1880.)  “…Mr. Babcock was a miller by trade, but being in poor health when he returned to Castile from Illinois, he went into the boot and shoe business which he followed till October, 1855 ; then came West, and settled in Fond du Lac Co., Wis., living in the town of Alto one and a half years ; then, in Springvale, seven years, and, in March, 1863, bought the farm now occupied by his widow on Sec. 12, in the town of Waupun, where he resided until his death, which occurred Dec. 12, 1877, in the 59th year of his age, having been nearly blind for the last eighteen years of his life.  Left two sons—Harlow N., born Oct. 11, 1850 ; married Lydia Fisher, of Waushara Co., Wis., Feb. 22, 1873, and now lives in Stoughton, Dane C., Wis., where he is foreman in a large flouring-mill ; Charles F., born April 29,1857, in Springvale ; is living with his mother on the homestead, which consists of 85 acres of land, valued at about $40 per acre ; P. O. Ladoga.”1

This is what I really have on Daniel Babcock.  I have proven/disproven some of the information contained in the sketch above.

First, I will show what I know about another possible member of the family – William D. Babcock.  This is the head of the family in which Orlow and his brother, George Washington, lived.

I will begin about William D. Babcock in my next installment.

Maggie

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SOURCES

 

  1. The History of Fond du Lac County Wisconsin…  Chicago:  Western Historical Company, 1880.

 

While going through items in his parents’ house, my husband came upon an old trunk.  He remembered the trunk as always being in the same spot, inside the enclosed front porch.  I asked him what was in the trunk, and he said that he thought it was Bringe family things.

Vance Harold Champion married Alberna Marie Bringe.  Vance and Alberna had three sons, one of them being my husband.  Alberna Marie Bringe was German – her father, Albert Henry,  arrived in the United States from Germany in 1883 at about 6 months of age, and her mother’s parents arrived in the United States from Germany in 1880, eight years before Alberna’s mother was born.

My husband asked me to open the trunk and make an inventory of what was in the trunk.  And, what an inventory it turned out to be!

There were many Bringe items in the trunk.  There was also a label in the lid of the trunk.  The label showed the trunk was made in San Francisco.  (Further research determined that the trunk belonged to a brother of Albert’s who traveled to San Francisco.)

One of the true “finds” in the trunk was some small calendar books.  These books were the diaries of Albert.  Albert traveled to the west from Ohio in the early 1900s to work in the oil fields in Oklahoma and Texas.  These diaries were where Albert recorded the information about the oil wells on which he worked.  The information included the dates worked, the depth of the well, his particular job at the well, and any other information that he decided to write down.  Quite a find!

One never really knows what one may find in an old trunk that belonged to your grandfather’s brother!

Maggie

Orlow and Phenie Cordelia Jones Babcock were my great-great grandparents.   This is the 2nd blog concerning my research into the father of Orlow, Daniel P. Babcock.

According to The History of Fond Du Lac County Wisconsin, Daniel P. Babcock was born 1 February 1818 in Riga, Monroe County, New York.  (The History of Fond du Lac County Wisconsin…  Chicago:  Western Historical Company, 1880.)  “…his father died when he was 3 years old, and he was bound out to Elihu Burr, of Castile, in what was then Genesee Co., now Wyoming Co., N. Y.  When 19 years of age he went to Illinois and lived three years in De Kalb Co. ; then returned to Castile and was married, by Elder Joseph Weeks, April 23, 1843, to Adelia Sturtevant, who was born Oct. 30, 1822, in Castile, N. Y., daughter of Noah and Cynthia Sturtevant, natives of Vermont, who came to Castile before they were married, and lived there till 1867 ; then went to Livingston Co., where Mrs. Sturtevant died Aug. 3, 1875, in the 76th year of her age ; Mr. Sturtevant came to Wisconsin in October, 1877, and is now living with his daughter, Mrs. Babcock, in the 70th year of his age.  Mr. and Mrs. Sturtevant were among the first settlers of Genesee Co., N. Y., and had their share of the privations and Indian scares incident to this early settlement of that county ;  Mrs. Babcock well remembers sitting, when a little girl, in the lap of Mary Jemison, the famous “white woman” of Western New York…”1

I will continue this excerpt from The History of Fond du Lac County Wisconsin in my next blog!

Maggie

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SOURCES

  1.  The History of Fond du Lac County Wisconsin…  Chicago:  Western Historical Company, 1880.

There is something about which I wonder.  Do little girls still get dressed in their Easter outfits on Easter?

There were three of us girls (no boys) in our family when I was growing up.  Every Easter, we would get a new-to-us Easter outfit.  I am thinking that the outfits were “brand new,” but that was not what was important to us.  What was important was a “new” dress, with a matching hat, and white patent leather shoes.  And, before gloves went out-of-style, we would also have a pair of white gloves to wear!

The shoes were always new as we had outgrown the previous year’s shoes!  And, the dress was new because it was not a hand-me-down!

And, of course, Dad would take a picture of the three of us standing on the front step!  I have many of the photos that were taken on Easter, and I can follow how the styles changed over the years.

Do little girls still get a new Easter outfit?

Maggie

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