My name is Maggie Champion, and I am the sole proprietor of Maggie’s Genealogy Service.  I am a professional genealogist, and a member of the Association of Professional Genealogists.

Please click on the links at the top of this page, or on the right side of this page, for more information.

You have reached my Blog page.  My blog had its first post on Tuesday, 31 January 2012!

Thank you for visiting!

Maggie Champion

mcgen@cinergymetro.net

As shown previously, Christian Friedrick Martin Bringe and his wife, Marie Hahn Bringe, arrived in the U. S. with his children Joh., Friedr. Ernst, Carl, Anna, Martin, and Albert, on the ship Moravia, on 14 November 1884 from Germany.

As has been shown in previous posts, Friedrick and Marie (Hahn) had the following children: Frederich C. (born 1873), Anna Maria (born 6 September 1878), Martin Friedrich Wilhelm (born 20 October 1880), Ernest H. (born 22 December 1875), Carl Friederich (born 6 September 1878), and Albert Henry (born 2 June 1883).

Recently found are some diaries that belonged to Albert Henry Bringe. As discovered in the diaries, he worked in various states, and in Canada, in the early 1900’s, as a person who dug oil wells. The diaries are shedding some light as to his travels and the process of digging an oil well!
Here are a few scans from the 1904 diary.

1904 inside 21904 inside 121904 inside 211904 inside 22

What is now known:
1. Albert H. Bringe lived in Williston, Ottawa Co., Ohio, for a least some of the time during the period of the diary
2. Albert was 6 feet tall and weighed 197 pounds – other particulars are found as well
3. On 17 July 1904, Albert was “dressing tools Well No. 2. on Bringe Farm, Bringe Bros.”
4. In February 1905, Albert had “Dressed Tools for W. Elliott”
5. Also in February 1905, Albert paid for “Bord Goe Truman” – paid for board with Joe Truman?
6. In June 1905, Albert worked for Garber Oil and Gas Co.

As usual, as more information is being found, more questions are raised as well!
1. Did the Bringe Brothers have their own oil company?
2. Who was W. Elliott?
3. Who was Goe[Joe] Truman, and in what location was Albert boarding?
4. What was the Garber Oil and Gas Company? Where was it located?

This is it for now. More in Bringe-22.

Maggie

PS According to a wikipedia.org article for Garber, Oklahoma, “Agriculture, oil, and cattle are Garber’s primary industries. Petroleum drilling began as early as 1904-5. The Garber Oil and Gas Company (partly owned by Burton A. Garber) installed Garber’s first gas well in 1905. The Garber Field was opened in 1916 when the Hoy well came in at two hundred barrels per day.”

Bringe – 20

As shown previously, Christian Friedrick Martin Bringe and his wife, Marie Hahn Bringe, arrived in the U. S. with his children Joh., Friedr. Ernst, Carl, Anna, Martin, and Albert, on the ship Moravia, on 14 November 1884 from Germany.

As has been shown in previous posts, Friedrick and Marie (Hahn) had the following children: Frederich C. (born 1873), Anna Maria (born 6 September 1878), Martin Friedrich Wilhelm (born 20 October 1880), Ernest H. (born 22 December 1875), Carl Friederich (born 6 September 1878), and Albert Henry (born 2 June 1883).

Recently found are some diaries that belonged to Albert Henry Bringe. As discovered in the diaries, he worked in various states, and in Canada, in the early 1900’s, as a person who dug oil wells. The diaries are shedding some light as to his travels and the process of digging an oil well!

In the next few posts, I will share some of the entries found in the diaries. If there is someone who is reading these posts that knows more about the process of digging oil wells, my hope is that you will reply and shed some more light on the process. The process that I will be outlining is that obtained from reading the diary entries. There are times that the spelling is such that it is difficult to know what was actually meant. So, please feel free to explain further!

This is it for now. More in Bringe-21.

Maggie

Bringe – 19

As shown previously, Christian Friedrick Martin Bringe and his wife, Marie Hahn Bringe, arrived in the U. S. with his children Joh., Friedr. Ernst, Carl, Anna, Martin, and Albert, on the ship Moravia, on 14 November 1884 from Germany.

As has been shown in previous posts, Friedrick and Marie (Hahn) had the following children: Frederich C. (born 1873), Anna Maria (born 6 September 1878), Martin Friedrich Wilhelm (born 20 October 1880), Ernest H. (born 22 December 1875), Carl Friederich (born 6 September 1878), and Albert Henry (born 2 June 1883).

Another item that has been found is an obituary for a Chas. Bringe.

Chas Bringe obit

 

As can be seen from the obituary, Chas. Bringe died at his parents’ home on Monday afternoon. According to the calendar for 1905, this would have been 3 April 1905. The funeral was to be held on Thursday, 6 April 1905, with interment in Woodville Cemetery.

According to the gravestones of Frederick and Marie Bringe (see Bringe-5), a son of theirs was Carl F. Bringe. Carl F. died 3 April 1905.

So, found is the obituary for Carl F. Bringe!

This is it for now. More in Bringe-20.

Maggie

You have been searching for records for a few hours in the state of Virginia. Then, you find your ancestor moved to Virginia from North Carolina. So, off you go there!

However, when you “go” to North Carolina, be careful. You are now in another time period and another state. Are the taxing procedures that same? What about probate practices?

Be careful that you know the particularities about the state where you are searching!

Maggie

You have been searching for records online. Great, isn’t it!!

And then, you find that someone transcribed the obituary for your great-great-grandfather! Wow, what a find!

The transcription is there, but there is no mention of the source of the obit. Did it come from the newspaper close to where your relative lived? Did it come from the church newsletter? Did it come from “out of thin air”? Which one?

Be careful where there is no source listed. There is no way to know for sure that the information is “real” unless there is a source. And, even though there is a source, check out the source! The source may have been “created” too!

Maggie

When visiting a courthouse, one doesn’t really know about the security screenings that may be involved in the visit. That is why it is important to ask ahead of time. If it is required to show some form of identification while visiting the courthouse, then make sure you have it with you. And, if “extra” papers are not allowed, then make sure to leave them in the car.

Also, if you are planning to make a copy of a record, make sure that you know what the courthouse allows. Some courthouses allow scanners and others do not. And, some allow certain kinds of scanners. Also know what the copy policy is. Is it okay to make copies?

I have visited courthouses that allow Flip-Pal scanners, some that do not allow any type of scanner, and some that do not allow copies to be made! So, check ahead of time!

Maggie

When using the census, be careful to look at the census date.

The census taker may have come to your ancestor’s house on 16 June 1910, but the questions were supposed to be answered as of 15 April 1910. What if a child was born into the household in May?

Did your ancestor answer the questions “as of” that date? And, did the census take make sure that the questions were answered such? Some census takers were more concerned about accuracy than others, and some of the informants may not have understood about the “census date”.

So, be careful!

Maggie